strong in steel

Fly-shooters
Fly-shooters
Fly-shooters
Fly-shooters

Fly-shooters

December 2018 - The Dutch fly-shooter fleet has been growing slowly but steadily since 2005. Until now, most of the new fly-shooters have been converted fishing vessels from other countries but new fly-shooters are now being built more frequently, in the Netherlands and elsewhere.

De Boer Staal recently delivered complete shipbuilding packages for the construction of four new fly-shooters. The contracts were for the Padmos shipyard from Stellendam. Two vessels will be built in France and two in the Netherlands.

Sheet steel and Holland profiles

For the construction of these new fly-shooters, De Boer Staal supplied sheet steel (5 to 100 mm thick) and bulb flats in shipbuilding Grade A, AH36, DH36 and S355J2 N, all with a 3.2 LR (Lloyds Register) certificate. All the steel was blasted by De Boer Staal and coated with two-component shop primer Sigmaweld MC, before being cut to size and shaped by De Boer Snijbedrijf. 

Fly shooting

Fly shooting originated in Denmark as 'snurrevaed' and it was developed further by the Scottish. A fly-shooter fishes behind the vessel with lines that pull a net. The lines churn up the seabed slightly, startling the fish, which then swim forward. When the nets are pulled in, the large and strong fish are driven together at the last moment into the net. The small, undersized fish escape.

Last year, fly-shooters caught 3.5 million kilos of red gurnard, 1 million kilos of mullet, 1.6 million kilos of squid and 1.2 million kilos of mackerel. There is a lot of demand for squid and mullet caught by fly-shooters. The catch contains almost no dirt from the seabed and so the quality of the fish is almost always excellent. And the fish reaches the shore quickly, travelling from the sea to the kitchen almost immediately.

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